Life in Tudor England

The children are dressed in Tudor clothing and use small hammers to tap patterns into leather during our KS2 Tudor workshop.
Children make leather bookmarks during a Life in Tudor England workshop.

It is the year of our Lord 1536, and it is a difficult time in the court of King Henry VIII. His second wife, Anne Boleyn, has not produced a male heir and has fallen out of favour with the King. Rumours are swirling about the Queen’s behaviour – is it possible she has committed treason? What might Henry do?

The children become courtiers and servants of the time period. The tasks they complete would be typical of the era, including writing with quills, soap making and sewing, among others.

The afternoon features a Tudor “banquet” — it is time to celebrate Henry’s new queen!

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Christmas Edition: A holiday version of our Tudor day explores events that occur in the second half of 1536, including the Pilgrimage of Grace that saw Northern protests against Henry’s dissolution of the monasteries. Emphasis is placed on Christmas traditions of the period, and activities have a holiday twist.

LEARN ABOUT LIFE UNDER THE LAST TUDOR MONARCH, ELIZABETH I, WITH OUR VIRTUAL WORKSHOP

 

How You Contribute to the Day

To make the most of your children’s day, please help us with the following:

  • Adult helpers: The number of children participating determines how many work stations our Teacher brings. Please recruit a corresponding number of adults (teachers, TAs, parents) to oversee the activities and the afternoon session. (Your booking form lists the exact number needed.)
  • The school hall: Please reserve the school hall for the full day (it is not a problem if it is used for lunch).
  • Food: Please provide a small amount of food for the afternoon banquet. (It is a very small amount that helps set the scene — you can find details in the booklet when it arrives.)
  • Costumes: Please encourage the children to dress up in simple costumes. It helps them feel the part.

Please note that we still require adult helpers for in-school days. If this conflicts with your schools coronavirus policies, please let us know — a virtual workshop might be a better option for your school.

 

What to Wear

Costumes need not be complicated — we suggest the following “homemade” alternatives:

  • Boys: A large, plain shirt with a large collar; a belt or cord at the waist; plain, dark, baggy trousers tucked into long socks.
  • Girls: A plain shirt with large collar; a long, plain skirt; a plain white apron; a plain white kerchief for the head.

INFORMATION ABOUT OUR VIRTUAL WORKSHOP HAS MOVED — SEE OUR VIRTUAL WORKSHOP HERE